Grain To Bread

Grain to Bread

Bread is about nourishment and connection. Using non-commodity whole grain wheat transforms flavor, nutrition, and communities. Well sourced wheat can bring out unique flavors from different regions and even within the same region the harvest can impact flavor as well. Wheat and grain grown with sustainable practices can reverse greenhouse gases.  When we buy from growers and millers who uphold these practices, we support small scale farming and baking networks while making a positive impact on our environment. Below are a few places to begin.

“Well sourced wheat can bring out unique flavors from different regions”

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Bluebird Grain Farms offers a variety of grains, including ancient grains like einkorn and emmer which some people with gluten sensitivity find easier to digest.
They also freshly mill flour for shipping.
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Rancho Llano Seco is a responsible family farm offering a wide variety of items, including ancient grains, many of them can be ordered milled.
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Moon Family Farm grows our favorite Hard Red Wheat using sustainable no-till farming practices. Coordinate with Garrett to order your wheat berries.
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Camas Country Mill in Oregon sells several varieties of flours and grains. They offer single origin flours, wheat berries to mill at home, as well as specialty flour blends! They use stone milling practices.
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Grist and Toll is the first flour mill in Los Angeles in nearly 100 years! They are on a mission to revive grain economies by supporting grain farmers growing special varieties and offering excellent flours to home bakers. Don’t miss the helpful descriptions of the flour selections!
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Hayden Flour Mills in Arizona started with a mission to bring back a mill that had almost been forgotten. They offer beautiful varieties of wheat berries, flour blends, baking mixes (pancakes, cornbread), even crackers!

Wheat berries perfectly preserve the nutrition and viability of the germ and endosperm inside the outer coating of the bran. Once broken by milling, the healthy fatty acids are susceptible to oxidation from light and heat. Most flour has had the germ removed, so we miss out on the whole flavor of wheat as well as the nutrition. Milling flour just in time for use helps maximize health benefits and flavor, it also allows the baker to support smaller farms who might not have access to a good quality mill. Many small farms are bringing back unique and ancient varieties creating diversity and using sustainable practices we won’t find on commodity wheat farms. Just like fine wine and tasting the region or ethically sourced coffee, grain farms are creating a grain revival.

The Mockmill is a great option for a home mill to begin making your own flour! One of the biggest reasons I chose the Mockmill was because it uses stone milling, like the mills of hundreds and thousands of years ago. Stone milling doesn’t overheat the wheat like metal blades in some home mills, which damages the wheat’s nutrition.

This German-engineered machine makes it easy to mill and customize the fineness of the flour. It also has an environmentally friendly design using recycled wood fibers for the casing, which helps keep the cost more affordable. Wolfgang Mock, the creator, also developed the Komo brand and wants to make home milling accessible and affordable for every person. Before developing his first electric mill in 1980, he was a psychologist who worked with children with autism and became interested in the connection between nutrition and behavior. Mockmill offers three models: an attachment for stand mixer, the 100 model, and the 200 model, which is the one I use. The 200 model has more power and speed for milling larger quantities. It also looks beautiful in my kitchen!